Breast Cancer Awareness

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, which is an annual campaign to increase awareness of the disease. While most people are aware of breast cancer, many forget to take the steps to have a plan to detect the disease in its early stages and encourage others to do the same.

Other than skin cancer, breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women. Getting mammograms regularly can lower the risk of dying from breast cancer. If you are 50 to 74 years old, be sure to have a screening mammogram every two years. If you are 40 to 49 years old, talk to your doctor about when to start and how often to get a screening mammogram.

Throughout the month, I will provide you with information to help you spot the signs, know your risks and protect yourself. While some factors are hereditary, others are in your control.

Fast Facts About Breast Cancer

1. Each year in the United States, more than 200,000 women get breast cancer and more than 40,000 women die from the disease.

2. Men also get breast cancer, but it is not very common. Each year in the United States, about 2,000 men get breast cancer and about 400 men die from the disease.

3. Most breast cancers are found in women who are 50 years old or older, but breast cancer also affects younger women. About 11% of all new cases of breast cancer in the United States are found in women younger than 45 years of age.

4. Studies show that women with disabilities are less likely than women without disabilities to have received a mammogram during the past two years.

5. Black women have the highest breast cancer death rates of all racial and ethnic groups, and are 40% more likely to die of breast cancer than white women.

What Are the Symptoms?

There are different symptoms of breast cancer, and some people have no symptoms at all. Symptoms can include any change in the size or the shape of the breast, pain in any area of the breast, nipple discharge other than breast milk (including blood), and a new lump in the breast or underarm. If you have any signs that worry you, be sure to see your doctor right away.

Learn more at: cdc.govIMG_2186.JPG
October is all about PINK!

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